DLA Aviation
    NEWS

Ownership of attitudes, actions can help improve communication
By Trinace Johnson, DLA Aviation Public Affairs
Feb. 7, 2011
Peggy Nicholson, who works in DLA Aviation's Strategic Acquisition Directorate, participates in a seminar with its host, communications expert Steven Gaffney, at the Lotts Conference Center in Richmond, Jan. 26.
Peggy Nicholson, who works in DLA Aviation's Strategic Acquisition Directorate, participates in a seminar with its host, communications expert Steven Gaffney, at the Lotts Conference Center in Richmond, Jan. 26.
(Photo by Trinace Johnson)

The shortest distance between two points is a straight line. When the two points are people who work together and the line is communication, sometimes the route becomes fuzzy.

On Jan. 26, DLA Aviation in Richmond was once again visited by Steven Gaffney, creator of the Honest Communication Results Systemâ„¢. Gaffney describes his method of communication as a simple and effective method of communicating that has empowered individuals to speak to anyone, about anything, at any time.

During two sessions at the Lotts Conference Center open to all employees, Gaffney offered his same insights on communication that supervisors and senior leaders at DLA Aviation benefitted from during his previous visits to Richmond.

"You probably can't change 'the world,' but you can change 'your world,'" Gaffney told about 60 DLA employees at one of the sessions. He stressed the differences between what is real versus what is imagined. A lot of times, he said, office communication problems are the result of what someone has thought to be true and not what was actually, in fact, true.

Gaffney said people must take ownership over their attitudes and their own actions and not allow others to push their buttons.

"The more that we understand that we may be wrong, the better our lives will be," he said.

"I enjoyed the seminar very much," said Peggy Nicholson, who works DLA Aviation's Strategic Acquisition Directorate. She said that the information given would likely help people better deal with their co-workers.

Some of the key points Gaffney emphasized were:

  • Listen from a position that you may be wrong
  • Self-righteousness is toxic to a relationship
  • Time deepens wounds and deepens problems
  • In the absence of the notice, people fill in the vacuum with their imagination
  • Build your network and avoid inbred thinking
  • Post reminder signs that 50 to 70 percent of the time we may be wrong
  • Create a chart with what is real and what is imagined
  • Model the behavior that you seek
  • Train and condition people on how you want to be treated
  • What you teach, you will learn

Gaffney will continue to travel this year to repeat his seminar at various DLA locations throughout the country.